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I wrote before about the pear pie with great filling and crumbly dough. With some tweaks, it came out quite good and was gone within a few hours ūüôā Here is the upgraded version, including the filling from before:

Ingredients:

Crust:

1 1/4 cups Tami flour or other Gluten free flour substitute
1/4 cup almond butter
50 ml oil
pinch of salt
2 tbsp dark brown sugar
cold water
(My SIL suggested adding some baking powder and baking ahead of time with some beans inside so it doesn’t rise too much, but I haven’t tried it yet)

Filling:

8-10 small pears, unpeeled, cut into halves, seeds scooped out with a spoon, sliced
1/4 cup dark brown sugar
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tbsp Conditor flour (cornflour)

Instructions:

In the food processor, mix all the crust ingredients except the water. It will form a ball pretty quickly. Pulse until it falls apart again. At this point, start adding water slowly, mixing thoroughly before adding more water, until it forms into ball again. It will be sticky to the touch.

Put in a bag and refrigerate for 3 hours.

Preheat oven to 180¬įC.

10-15 minutes before taking out the dough, deseed and slice your pears and mix gently with the rest of the ingredients. Let rest for 15 minutes.

Press the dough into a pie dish. Refrigerate for 10 minutes.

Jpeg

See? Sticky.

Pour the pear mixture into the crust, including all juices. Flatten.

Jpeg

Before Baking

Bake for 55-60 minutes, until the filling has set (might be a little jiggly in the middle still).

Jpeg

Eat!

Now that’s pie!

Bon Apetit!

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I had a humongous amount of pears – the sweet kind that go soft after about maybe 5 minutes? My kids won’t touch anything if it even has a slightly different colored spot on it, so they refused to touch them ūüôĄ So I searched for pear pie recipes, that would be non dairy (as I¬†planned this for dessert for a meat meal) and gluten free. I quickly gave up and searched just for non dairy pear pie. I have Tami flour,¬†that is supposed to be a 1:1 gluten free flour substitute and I figured I’d use that. I went for this recipe. I skipped the liqueur (we had Druze guests for that meal, Druze don’t drink alcohol), and used yet another flour substitute for the¬†filling. Whew!

The result? Depends on your outlook (hence the title). The pear filling was excellent. The crust left much to be desired, being very crumbly. But it looked great!

Jpeg

Wow!

Investigator, as usual, ate it with gusto, the others didn’t touch it. I’m definitely keeping the¬†filling part of the recipe, and I’ll continue searching for a gluten free crust that’s worth making (and eating!).

Do you have any good pie recipes? Post them below!

Ingredients:

Crust:

1 1/4 cups Tami flour or other Gluten free flour substitute
1/4 cup almond butter (maybe more will make it less crumbly?)
50 gr margarine (maybe oil would be better?)
1/4 tsp salt (too much for a sweet pie, using a pinch next time)
1 tbsp dark brown sugar
ice cold water

Filling:

8-10 small pears, unpeeled, cut into halves, seeds scooped out with a spoon, sliced
1/4 cup dark brown sugar
1/4 tsp freshly grated nutmeg
1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
1 tbsp Conditor flour (cornflour)

Instructions:

In the food processor, mix the flour, the sugar and the salt. Add the margarine and the oil, and process until large crumbs. Add the ice water a tbsp at a time until dough comes together (maybe more water?). The dough came out with a great texture, which just made the result even more disappointing ūüė¶ I’ll go for sticky next time ūüėÄ Put in a bag and refrigerate for 3 hours.

Preheat oven to 180¬įC.

10-15 minutes before taking out the dough, deseed and slice your pears and mix gently with the rest of the ingredients. Let rest for 15 minutes.

Press the dough into a pie dish. Refrigerate for 10 minutes.

Jpeg

Does look crumbly, now that I ¬†look at it again… definitely more water.

Pour the pear mixture into the crust, including all juices. Flatten.

Jpeg

Before Baking

Bake for 55-60 minutes, until the filling has set (might be a little jiggly in the middle still).

Jpeg

Smell that pie!

Eat!

Have a great weekend!

 

 

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I had persimmons that needed using up, so I¬†thought¬†of making persimmon muffins (because¬†frankly¬†the time I tried to make persimmon cake it wasn’t very popular). My middle son, on the other hand, insisted on¬†chocolate¬†chip muffins, without persimmons. So I decided¬†to¬†do half and half: The same muffins, but in half with persimmon¬†pur√©e¬†and the other half with¬†yoghurt. Instead of looking for¬†yoghurt¬†muffins (of which I actually have some good recipes) or persimmon recipes (which I don’t) I took the recipe of¬†the¬†apple bites I made before, which were excellent, and put¬†yoghurt or persimmon¬†pur√©e¬†instead of the applesauce. Of course, I also added¬†chocolate¬†chips for my son ūüėČ

The results were awesome!

As persimmon¬†pur√©e¬†is very sweet, I put a little less sugar in the persimmon muffins; and the chocolate chips there were rather pointless (but don’t tell him that!). The¬†yoghurt¬†muffins were also¬†excellent¬†and¬†there¬†the¬†chocolate¬†chips really hit the spot.

In short – perfection in both halves ūüôā

Here are both halves of the recipe, 8 muffins each (2 tbsp per muffin):

Yoghurt chocolate chip

1/2 cup brown sugar
1/6 cup canola oil
2/3 cups white unsweetened yoghurt
1/2 cup spelt flour
1/2 cup white flour
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/2 tsp vanilla
chocolate chips to taste

Persimmon 

1/3 cup brown sugar
1/6 cup canola oil
2/3 cups puréed persimmon
1/2 cup spelt flour
1/2 cup white flour
3/4 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp cinnamon
1 pinch tsp ground nutmeg

In both cases, mix wet ingredients together, then mix dry ingredients in a separate bowl, then mix both until just combined. Spoon into muffin pan until 2/3 height. Bake in a preheated oven at 180¬įC for 15-20 minutes or until toothpick comes out clean.

The dividing line

The dividing line – left are slightly more orange than right

Bon Apetit!

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I’m joining the blog event Love food – Don’t Waste here. ¬†I already sent some of my blog posts (such as crumbles and jam for fruit, etc.), but I wanted to add some concentrated tips for not wasting food. I hate throwing away food.

Bread:

Four things to do with leftover bread:

1. Freeze. Defrost using a microwave or at room temperature. To defrost in the microwave, wrap with thin cloth towel and microwave 10-20 seconds (depending on how much bread). Some trial and error is needed, but the bread usually comes out as if it was just baked :).
2. French toast: That standby of old bread everywhere. Beat 1-2 eggs (depending on how much bread). Add a splash of milk or water. Dip bread slices in egg, both sides. Fry in a frying pan both sides until brown. Serve with jam, peanut butter, sprinkle sugar on top, chocolate syrup, maple syrup…

Quick Real Chocolate Syrup:

Ingredients:

4 squares good chocolate of your choice
few drops vegetable oil

Put chocolate in microwave safe glass, and microwave 30 seconds at a time until melted (chocolate doesn’t loose its shape in the microwave, so you need to actually mix with a spoon to see if it melted) . Add a few drops vegetable oil and mix. Serve.

Note: Never add water to melted chocolate, it causes it to seize (become gritty).

3. Breadcrumbs: Put bread in a straw bowl or plastic box with holes (such as what mushrooms are bought in) and let dry a few days. Once dry, process in food processor until you get crumbs. Excellent home-made breadcrumbs.

4. SemulKneidl: Literally: breadballs. This is a recipe of my MIL which we usually use just before Passover to get rid of all our bread. Basically you mix bread (typically at least a loaf) with one cup of milk, and mix until becomes a dough-like. If you need more liquids, add more water. Form into balls and boil for 20 minutes. Serve with sour cream or mushroom sauce.

Dairy Products:

Milk: Use up in chocolate milk or cornflakes, or make blintzes. Also, milk makes a great heavy cream substitute to use in sauces:

Heavy cream substitute:

One cup heavy cream = 1 cup less 2 tbsp milk+2 tbsp milk mixed with 2 tsp flour. You need to mix the flour with a small amount of milk first to prevent it from lumping. Then add the milk and the flour-milk mixture to your pan (or pot, or whatever). Heat until thickened to your liking. You can also add some butter for taste.

Yogurt: I just love putting in muffins. Another great option is freezing it to make frozen yogurt. Be warned, however – home-made frozen yogurt, unless made with an ice cream machine, tends to come out like ice rather than ice-cream.

Cottage cheese – I like to use it in a casserole. Basically mix your leftover pasta, some tomato puree or sauce, cottage cheese, olives if you like them, anything else you have on hand, sprinkle grated cheese on top, and bake covered for 30 minutes and uncovered for another 15 minutes (to get brown). I do this also when I don’t have any¬†leftovers¬†to use up at all :).

Potatoes:

Slice up and fry them. Potatoes don’t freeze well,¬†unfortunately.

Everything

A great leftover food is to slice all the leftovers you have (potatoes, meat, vegeatables, pasta, rice, etc.) and fry it all together. You can add a¬†chopped¬†onion. At the end, pour some beaten egg on top and wait for it to cook. This is my husband’s family sp√©cialit√© ūüôā

There are tons more great ideas out there – like shepherds pie with leftover chicken/meat and potatoes, or leftover meat lasagne, but they will be in¬†another¬†post…

Anther option which are always great is spreading¬†the¬†food around. For example, If I have too much watermelon, I give half to my parents and that way everyone is happy…

Love Food - Don't Waste

 

PS. I’m so sorry¬†for¬†your loss, Tes. My heart goes out to you. May you get strength and courage to face this terrible loss.

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